NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Blog

Revealing the spirit of Ike

  Bret Baier’s new book, “Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower’s Final Mission,” highlights Ike’s passing of the torch as commander in chief to Jack Kennedy as the key to opening the door to a better, more accurate understanding of Ike. Change of command in...

Washington and Eisenhower warned their successors against partisanship

The farewell addresses of two great presidents offer three pieces of sage advice for President Donald Trump this President's Day weekend, if he would take it. George Washington and Dwight Eisenhower, who modeled his farewell address on Washington, gave carefully...

The Little-Known Legacy of America’s 34th President

WASHINGTON -- When President Donald Trump was sworn into office on January 20, 2017, many comparisons were made between him and those who occupied the White House before him, including Dwight D. Eisenhower, who, like Trump, came into office with no prior political...

Seven Business Leadership Lessons From Dwight Eisenhower

This article is by Bret Baier, the chief political anchor of Fox News Channel and author of Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower’s Final Mission.         Dwight Eisenhower never worked in the business sector. But his leadership principles, cultivated in war and...

The Story Behind This Week’s Best Sellers

Transitions: The Fox News anchor Bret Baier, whose previous best seller was about his young son’s heart condition, is back on the list, this time with a work of popular history: “Three Days in January” (written with Catherine Whitney) debuts at No. 2 on the hardcover...

Bret interviews on CSPAN’s After Words

After Words with Bret Baier Bret Baier talked about his book Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower’s Final Mission, in which he looks at the exchange of power from President Eisenhower to President Kennedy. He is interviewed by Susan Eisenhower. To view please...

In Some Ways, He’s a Bit Like Ike: Our first nonpolitician president since Eisenhower.

During the 1952 campaign, Dwight Eisenhower boldly announced that if he won the presidency, “I shall go to Korea." He believed he could broker peace in the Korean conflict, which had reached a stalemate under Harry Truman. About two months before he took office, Ike flew to Korea on a visit that would set the stage for the end of the Korean War six months into his presidency. President Truman was outraged that a president-elect would step into foreign policy in such a direct way. It was an audacious break with protocol. But the public was behind Ike, and, more important, the North Koreans and their Chinese allies took him seriously. In their eyes, he was not the inexperienced president-elect but the revered general who meant business. He had credibility with them that Truman lacked. When I was researching and writing my new book, Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower's Final Mission, I was intrigued by this story. I thought it demonstrated how a nonpolitician could shake things up.